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Oversize Load – What You Should Do When You See An Oversized Load On A Road Near You

Loads that might be considered oversize include trucks carrying construction machinery such as cranes, pre-built homes, containers, or construction elements like beams, generators or propellers.

Before seeing an oversize load, you may see a car or 4-wheel drive vehicle ahead, which is called a pilot vehicle, an escort car or a flag car. Its role is to warn drivers of the approach of an oversize load, evaluate the safety of the route and keep the truck driver informed of the road conditions ahead. The car will have flashing lights, flags and/or a sign to indicate that an oversized load is on its way.

Safety and consideration are the watchwords when sharing the road with oversize loads.

Be prepared

Upon seeing an escort car or the oversize load itself, be prepared to move over, slow down, and stop. A pilot vehicle may signal you to slow down or warn you to pull off the road.

Be patient

Many drivers grow impatient when their journey is slowed by oversize loads and/or when there are few passing opportunities. Stay safe by not taking unnecessary risks.

An oversize load may well require both lanes on roundabouts, so leave plenty of room for the truck to maneuver.

Be cautious

In addition to remembering that loaded trucks have a longer braking distance than cars, consider the potential gain, safety and legality of overtaking. Ask yourself how far it is to the next designated overtaking lane and consider the unusual length and/or width of the vehicle ahead.

If you decide to overtake, maintain a safe following distance, make sure that you have enough room to safely complete the maneuver, remember to indicate and check that no-one is trying to overtake YOU. Be prepared to retreat to your former position in the event of a miscalculation or an unexpected road event. If you cannot see the truck driver in their mirrors they are unable to see you.

Pull in when you can see the headlights of the oversize load in your rearview mirror.

Regular Light Maintenance

The Importance of Checking All Your Light Systems With Regular Light Maintenance

Light systems are vitally important to the maintenance of every truck. Without properly functioning light systems you run the risk of getting into serious trouble on the road. If you are unable to see the environment around you due to faulty lights, you could get into a major accident, injuring or killing yourself or others. Regular light maintenance on your truck and trailer is a mandatory practice in the transport industry.

 

Faulty light systems are also a problem when it comes to safety and regulation compliance. Trucks need to be lit up to be on the road, and if your light system suddenly fails, you could end up with a large fine, leading to lost time and money for you and your business.

 

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Triton Transport Truck & Trailer Repair Shop

How can you avoid these issues? Instead of waiting for your lights to fail and dealing with emergency repairs, schedule regular light maintenance with the Triton Truck & Trailer Repair Shop. Regularly inspecting your light system will reveal issues that can be dealt with while they are still small, instead of waiting for larger problems to occur.

 

Having your light systems regularly inspected will save you money over the long run. Replacing and repairing aspects of your system on a non-emergent basis allows you and your truck repair team to have options instead of needing to scramble for a quick fix. It also ensures that you will not be surprised by a regulation or safety issue on the road, as you will have confidence that your lights are in good shape.

 

Regular light maintenance is just as important as any other inspection and repair work on your truck. Consider your light systems as integral as the engine – unless it is in good shape, you should not drive. Talk to one of the qualified mechanics at the Triton Transport Truck & Repair Shop about setting up a light system inspection and maintenance schedule.

Doing the impossible is kind of fun!

In July of 2014 Sonic Enclosures of Delta, BC was approached to build 7 buildings for a pair of new oil sands projects in Fort McMurray, Alberta. The catch was that for Sonic to be able to be competitive in the bidding process, they had to be able to ship the units at the size and weights required by the end user. The original design required for the buildings, was for them to come in at 70’ Long x 16’6” Wide x 14’6” High weighing in at 160,000lbs! This  weight that was too heavy for BC highways and wouldn’t have been possible. But for us – doing the impossible is kind of fun!

In August of 2014, Sonic brought Triton in to discuss the feasibility of the project and how it would be possible for the units to be shipped. After dozens of meetings, weeks of re-designs and countless moments where it didn’t seem possible (at some point someone suggested chartering an Antonov airplane to fly them there) a transportation plan was developed that made it feasible for Sonic to win the bid and guarantee transport feasibility.

The plan called for Sonic to complete the building to its full size and then remove two portions of the internal structure of the building. This way, the buildings would be light enough to be shipped through British Columbia to our Edmonton, Alberta facility. The buildings would still have the same dimensions, 70’ L x 16’6” W x 14’6” H but they would be reduced to a weight of 130,000lbs, (which was the determined maximum in British Columbia.) Our expanding perimeter frame 13 axle (Eleanor) would be utilized to transport all of the buildings to Edmonton where they would be unloaded via crane.

Triton Transport

Titon Transport

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Once the first two buildings had arrived in Edmonton, Triton would move the components that Sonic had removed from the buildings to Edmonton and Sonic would mobilize one of their fabrication teams to complete the re-assembly in Alberta.

With the significantly higher weight tolerance allowed in Alberta it would be no issue to move the buildings at there full weight from Edmonton to there final destination near Fort McMurray, AB.

Each building required 2 days of re-assembly, with Sonic utilizing Triton’s facility to complete the re-integration and inspection of the removed components.

When complete, the buildings, now back to their full 160,000lbs weight, would be loaded onto a hydraulic platform trailer (Karolina) and shipped to site for final delivery.

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What this project proves is that with the right amount of determination, and a client who is willing to do what is necessary, even a project that initially seemed impossible can be completed.

With the right equipment, the right people and the right plan anything is possible.

2 buildings down, 5 to go in early 2016!

Special mention to our Drivers Scott Lovell and Chris Southgate and Triton Pilot Cars: Sam Waldner and Randall Bell.